New York Spaces + Nasiri Carpets


Nasiri Carpets
Flatweave from Nasiri Carpets.

Jason Kontos moderated a lively discussion with renowned design panelists Tim Button, Young Huh, Kureck Jones and Nader Nasiri. The discussion, centered around the use of ancient carpet designs in modern spaces, aptly took place in Nasiri Carpets' brand new showroom during the New York Design Center's annual What's New, What's Next event. Below is a small recap of the interesting discourse that took place.

One of the questions first lobbied, had to do with how the design of a home was approached. "It always starts with the architecture of the space," said John Kureck. "We lay it out for living: how the room will be used, the environment outside if there is one, and the lighting. But primarily, we focus on the way people live. The rug is usually the first thing we choose. We start the design process from the ground up. Part of what appealed to us, and brought us to Nasiri in the first place, is that he's brought in these tribal flatweaves. Part of everyone's association with Persian carpets is a pile carpet of incredibly beautiful design. And what he has brought to us are these more rural and tribal pieces that have a sophistication but also a contemporary feel that works very well with modern interiors."

Nasiri Carpets
A Midcentury Modern Flatweave; Part of the Mazandaran
Flatweave Collection from Nasiri Carpets.

Young Huh also gave an interesting take. "When I saw the topic of ancient carpet designs in modern spaces, my first thought was about Persian rugs. Which is kind of what everything thinks of as a traditional rug, but it is really interesting that ancient design also refers to tribal design. And really a design that spoke to the people. It think that's really important, because ancient is primitive, and primitive comes from prime, or prime number. It is the very first essence of design—something that speaks to all people. And it is sort of what modernism is about right? It's about distilling and going back to the most basic fundamental design principles, and that's what i love about the flatweaves. Understanding that they're not just cool, there really is this history and logic to the very first designs. That really starts to blow you away."

Tim Button, who walked us through a few of his projects, explained the notion of how rugs can define or change spaces. "I see the rug as a street a lot of time in interiors. Especially with the flatweaves that tend to be more long and narrow. Of course they can be any length, but I just happen to like the idea of a street," says Tim Button. The designer incorporated a 10-foot-wide by 22-foot-long rug into one of his design projects. And as he says "It was able to join two distinct areas in a room and really create a street. And it's how you walk through the room—it really defined two different spaces. The other idea is to implement a small rug, which defines a smaller area within a large space. I like the fact that rugs really do contain space. And in a very large loft, you can really create several rooms without walls and rugs can define that space."

While there was so much more discussed, one great tip we received: Never use fibershield on a good rug.

New York Spaces + Nasiri Carpets