September 19, 2016

Achille Salvagni Imbues a Central Park Home with European Flair

Italian architect and designer Achille Salvagni imbues a Long Island couple's Central Park pied-à-terre with natural forms and a luxurious shimmer.

by Deborah L. Martin interior designer Achille Salvagni photographer Paolo Petrignani architecture Achille Salvagni

BELLA NATURA

When a Long Island couple wanted a pied-à-terre in the city they turned to Italian architect and designer Achille Salvagni. This was his first full project in the United States, and to it he brought a distinctly European flair. "I started my career in Rome, but I also worked in Sweden and was influenced by the organic design and natural shapes used by people like Alvar Aalto." Salvagni continues, "Using natural shapes is really in my DNA." The roughly 1,500-square-foot apartment is on Fifth Avenue facing Central Park. "The amazing view is really the trophy here, it truly exemplifies the adage: location, location, location." Salvagni adds, "It was important to echo the natural beauty outside, with beautiful textures and shapes inside."

The silk, hand-knotted rug designed by Salvagni and crafted in Tibet adds structure, and is flanked by a Hobbit console in bronze and glass and Tomaso Buzzi side chairs with parchment legs and velvet upholstery. The peacock wall sconce by Herve Van der Straeten is from Maison Gerard.
The silk, hand-knotted rug designed by Salvagni and crafted in Tibet adds structure, and is flanked by a Hobbit console in bronze and glass and Tomaso Buzzi side chairs with parchment legs and velvet upholstery. The peacock wall sconce by Herve Van der Straeten is from Maison Gerard.

The architectural layout of the apartment, which Salvagni created, has three main destinations accessible from a main foyer area. "I created balance in the living room, between the entrance to the kitchen on the left and the foyer on the right, and I framed the connections between all the spaces with dark lines." The three main areas flow organically: The "night" area includes the master bedroom, bath, and closet; the living area connects to a den that can be used as a guest bedroom; and the kitchen and dining area is an open room that allows the view to take center stage.

The living room flows into the dining area to the left and the foyer to the right. Gio cabinet from the Achille Salvagni Atelier collection rests under an undulating Venetian-style verre églomisé mirror, created by artist Miriam Ellner. It reflects a pop of red from a painting by Lucio Fontana, Concetto Spaziale (1954), that is a focal point in the room. Side chairs circa 1925 by Tomaso Buzzi are covered in velvet.
The living room flows into the dining area to the left and the foyer to the right. Gio cabinet from the Achille Salvagni Atelier collection rests under an undulating Venetian-style verre églomisé mirror, created by artist Miriam Ellner. It reflects a pop of red from a painting by Lucio Fontana, Concetto Spaziale (1954), that is a focal point in the room. Side chairs circa 1925 by Tomaso Buzzi are covered in velvet.

The furnishings and color scheme create a relaxing environment, one that echoes the chicness and attitudes of the clients. "The lady of the house dresses in a calming and soft palette, with a dash of vibrant color in a scarf, shoes, or clutch. I did the same in the design details such as the persimmon pillows in the living room, pops of red in artworks, and the colors of the linens in the bedroom." He adds, "The bed looks like a Mondrian." The lighting and accessories inspired his first collection for Maison Gerard. "I went to my Roman roots and hired the best craftsmen and stone workers. I took materials inspired by heritage and together with these artisans turned it into a new language for the future." Conical table lamps crafted of onyx and bronze with finials shaped like tree branches, mirrors that undulate with organic lines, lampshades that curve seductively, all create a dialogue with natural beauty of Central Park, just outside the windows.

*Interested in more articles like this? Sign up for our Newsletter!

Join New York Spaces' Weekly Newsletter.

Subscribe