April 12, 2017

Q&A with Robert Kime on His New Collection of Fabrics Debuting at John Rosselli & Associates

Robert Kime's first venture into the field of antiques and interiors was as an antiques dealer.

by New York Spaces

Kime Shope in Ebury
Robert Kime Shop on Ebury Street in London; James Mitchell.
Robert Kime in his Shop
Robert Kime in front of his shop.

Robert Kime's first venture into the field of antiques and interiors was as an antiques dealer. To observe his work is certainly to appreciate that influence. With a consistent style, resplendent in English charm and aristocratic influence, a Robert Kimes design is easily recognized. He layers fabrics and textures and antiques and color to create spaces that leave a rich and luxurious impression, yet are also comfortable—a room's livability is always at the forefront of Kime's mind.

The British designer has been working for close to 50 years in the design industry, and has an international portfolio of grand houses to his credit. His wide roster of clients include the Prince of Wales and the Duke of Beaufort. He also had a book published last year which details twelve of his noted designs. The spaces showcased range from cottages to castles, all equally as chic.

Robert Kime shop
Robert Kime Shop photography by James Mitchell;
Shown: Karabak Claret Wallpaper.

With his commitment to using antique fabrics and wall coverings in his interiors he began looking for a satisfactory replacement when his own personal collection began dwindling. Along with his knowledge and experience in antique dealing and interior design, he now boasts an extensive range of fabrics, wallpapers, carpets, furniture, and lighting, most often reminiscent of period pieces and all embodying the distinct style Robert Kimes has become synonymous with.

His textile designs take influence from a personal amassment of antique fabrics and fragments and his latest collection—recently launched at John Rosselli's New York Showroom—draws inspiration from a book of Italian prints, stained glass windows, Japanese block prints, and of course, his own extensive archive.

Robert Kime Rennes
Robert Kime New Collection, Rennes.

NYS: Tell us about the latest fabric collection recently launched at John Rosselli & Associates New York Showroom. What was the inspiration?

Robert Kime: We had a book of Italian Prints, which was our starting point of creating the fabrics, as well as some from my own archive.

NYS: We love the new Rennes! Can you tell us more about this pattern?

RK: This was inspired by the stained glass window in Rennes Cathedral. The creative team and I loved it and it makes a lovely fabric.

NYS: How did you get your start in textile design?

RK: When my stock of old textiles started to diminish, I start creating, or re-creating textiles for my range of papers and fabrics with my friend Gisella Milne-Watson.

NYS: In a few words, what would you say your brand is synonymous with?

RK: Colourful & Comfortable

NYS: We heard of a story involving John Rosselli and the creation of a blue and white colorway? Can

Robert Kime at Work
Robert Kime at Work.

you elaborate?

RK: John had requested a blue and white fabric and we found a beautiful Japanese block print, which has become our new fabric, Sheema.

NYS: What is your process for creating new designs?

RK: We start with a creative meeting, finding inspiration from my archive and running some sample tests before coming back and seeing which ones will work best.

NYS: Do you have a favorite fabric design? Is so, which one and why?

RK: I use a mixture of styles so regularly in my projects that it is difficult to choose just one.

NYS: What is a typical day in your life like?

RK: Seeing my showrooms in London, then wandering down Pimlico Road to do some shopping.

NYS: What are you working on now? What can we expect to see from you in the future?

RK: We are currently working on four new prints and new wallpapers for release in the fall.

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