January 4, 2018

Tahir Demircioglu of builtd Dishes on the Company's Current Projects

Builtd is currently working on several residential and commercial projects including boutique luxury condominium, 570 Broome.

by New York Spaces

570 Broome Street
570 Broome.
Tahir of Buildt
Tahir Demircioglu of buildt.

NYS: What are you working on now?

Tahir Demircioglu: Builtd is currently working on several residential and commercial projects including boutique luxury condominium, 570 Broome, to a 45-unit multifamily residential building on Long Island and a project called Pip's Island, an immersive play experience for children, among other commercial projects.

NYS: What are some of your favorite examples of your work in NYC?

Tahir Demircioglu: One of my favorite examples include 570 Broome in West Soho, which was designed to reference the area's industrial past with a silhouette evocative of staggered cubes and features a state-of-the-art façade that is not only self cleaning but actually purifies the air through photocatalysis and superhydrophilicity. The Atelier and Silver Towers on 42nd Street and The Laurel on UES are also favorites although designed while heading the design department of renowned but now-closed architectural firm Costas Kondylis & Partners.

NYS: How does your background help you navigate global real estate development?

Tahir Demircioglu: As a Turkish-American architect who's well versed and educated in both countries, I had the opportunity to design large-scale mixed-use complexes and residential towers in Europe, Asia and North America.

Having a thorough understanding of Eastern and Western cultures enables me to respond to different spatial and functional requirements architecturally, while interacting with clients in norms familiar to each of them, both in the creative and social sense.

Tahir Demircioglu
570 Broome Street.

I've seen on many occasions that melding local solutions with global architectural tactics resulted in excellent spaces to live, work and create.

NYS: What is your history in design and how has it affected your present?

Tahir Demircioglu: I started my career in Turkey in a firm producing many competition entries (still a common way for architectural commissions in Europe), for large-scale international projects ranging from airports to museums. This type of work gave me the ability to analyze large design problems effectively and produce solutions within short time frames, ultimately enabling me to capture the bigger picture promptly.

After completing my graduate studies and moving to NYC in 2001, I worked at Costas Kondylis and Partners for nine years, where I led the design of many notable residential high rises. The firm was at the epicenter of NY residential real estate and I had first hand experience of the whole development process from early feasibilities to completion of construction.

Prior to establishing builtd, I was the design partner at JFA, a boutique design firm, from 2009 to 2012. Due to the financial crisis and crippled housing market in USA, the firm's focus was Middle East and Eastern Europe.

This multifaceted experience permits me to analyze complex architectural problems and provide creative solutions immediately.

NYS: When and why did you decide to found your own firm, builtd?

Tahir Demircioglu: I founded builtd in December 2012. It was simply time to put my skills to work under my name and principles. I think that every architect dreams of his/her own practice, but professional maturity and intuition makes us take the leap.

NYS: What is the ethos behind your company?

Tahir Demircioglu: Our goal is a sustainable praxis both in process and end product.

We also believe in a well-balanced, comprehensive approach where private vs public, financial vs rational and creative vs functional aspects of projects are simultaneously considered in an unbiased way.

NYS: Where and what would your dream project consist of?

Tahir Demircioglu: I am torn between a spacious villa on Mediterranean and a residential addition to the skyline viewable from Central Park.

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